Friday, April 19, 2024
HomeFeaturesBLM Crews Complete Fire Safety - Land Health Project at Eagle Lake

BLM Crews Complete Fire Safety – Land Health Project at Eagle Lake

A Fire crewman uses a drip torch to ignite a slash pile near Eagle Lake. Photo by Karl Todd, BLM
A Fire crewman uses a drip torch to ignite a slash pile near Eagle Lake. Photo by Karl Todd, BLM

Just steps ahead of winter storms, fire crews from the Bureau of Land Management’s Eagle Lake Field Office in early December set fire to about 500 piles of brush and juniper limbs, completing the last prescribed burning of a 10-year project to improve wildfire safety and landscape health near Eagle Lake in northeast California.

The pile burning was the last phase of the Stones-Bengard-Spaulding Community Fire Safe Project, a partnership effort launched in January 2004 along the boundaries of three rural communities at the north shore of California’s second largest natural lake. The Lassen County Community Development Department, CAL FIRE, BLM and Lassen County Fire Safe Council were the key partners in the effort funded in part by a BLM National Fire Plan federal assistance grant.

Flames rip through slash piles in the last burning operation for a fire safe project near Eagle Lake in Lassen County. Photo by Karl Todd, BLM
Flames rip through slash piles in the last burning operation for a fire safe project near Eagle Lake in Lassen County. Photo by Karl Todd, BLM

In the projects, crews used machinery or hand cut juniper trees that were encroaching into sage-steppe habitats along the communities. In all, more than 90 acres were treated in six treatment units ranging in size from 11 acres to more than 400 acres. The juniper trees provided fuel for a regional biomass electrical generating plant and firewood for local homes. In addition, the Lassen County Fire Safe Council treated about 600 acres of private lands.

In addition to reducing wildfire risk to the towns, the work benefits wildlife habitat by improving plant diversity.

About 200 people live year-round in the three communities, but the population grows to more than 2,000 during high use summer periods. The lake and its surroundings are favored by anglers, hunters, campers and bicyclists. The lake supports trophy-sized Eagle Lake trout and is home to wildlife including bald eagles, osprey and mule deer.

With summer temperatures in the 90s, average annual rainfall of only 14 to 18 inches and frequent windy conditions, the area has a high wildfire risk. Heavy buildups of juniper on public lands were contributing to the risk, and led the partner agencies to launch the fire safe project a decade ago.

A rural home is visible through the smoke as slash piles are ignited in a project to improve community fire safety near Eagle Lake. Photo by Karl Todd, BLM
A rural home is visible through the smoke as slash piles are ignited in a project to improve community fire safety near Eagle Lake. Photo by Karl Todd, BLM

 

 

 

 

Jeremy Couso
Jeremy Couso
SusanvilleStuff.com Publisher/Editor
RELATED ARTICLES
Susanville
clear sky
42.6 ° F
42.6 °
42.6 °
75 %
0mph
0 %
Fri
66 °
Sat
69 °
Sun
73 °
Mon
72 °
Tue
71 °
- Advertisment -

Most Popular

- Advertisement -